SCRANTON: Terra Preta hosts a PA IPL Earth Hour evening

This year, Terra Preta will be hosting an Earth Hour gathering. The lights will be out during dinner from 8-9pm. We invite you to join us in celebrating and making a difference for our planet!

Terra Preta has partnered with Rabbi Daniel Swartz of Temple Hesed and PA IPL Pennsylvania Interfaith Power & Light to bring this global event to Scranton!

What to expect: During the hour of 8-9pm, the lights will be out in the dining room and you will be eating solely by candle light. In addition to our dinner menu, we will have local and sustainable dinner features, utilizing our local farmers while reducing our waste. We will have a few special guests with us. You will have a chance to get to know local farmers (Fullers Overlook Farm will be there) and learn about ways to access locally grown food. From 6-9pm we will also have live music brought to you by Mark Woodyatt Violin and Entertainment.

We would like to invite you to join Terra Preta in what promises to be an amazing and inspiring global celebration of our collective commitment to the planet. Be sure to make your reservation soon by calling Terra Preta at 570-871-4190

Earth Hour is a worldwide grassroots movement by World Wildlife Fund to unite people to take action for the planet. Earth Hour was started in Sydney, Australia in 2007 and since then it has grown to engage supporters in over 172 countries and territories worldwide. During this global moment of solidarity, Earth Hour supporters around the world to take a stand to solve our planet’s biggest environmental challenge yet and shine a light on climate action.

To make reservations for Earth Hour Dinner, please call Terra Preta at 570-871-4190

On Yom Kippur, Jewish Texts Speak to the Pope’s Letter

daniel headshotRabbi Daniel Swartz asked the crowd to close their eyes and imagine the first thing that comes to mind at the word “environment.”

“How many of you had people in that image?” he asked as their eyes opened. Most people shook their heads.

“We separate ourselves from the environment,” Rabbi Swartz said. “If you understand the environment is where we live … then it becomes a little more important.”

On Wednesday, the spiritual leader of Scranton’s Temple Hesed led a discussion that matched segments of “Laudato si’,” Pope Francis’ environmental encyclical, with texts from the Torah and Jewish thinkers from ancient to modern times.

Environmental mandates in the Torah range all the way back to the Jewish prophets, with versus like Isaiah 5:8, reading “Woe to those who add house to house and join field to field, til there is room for none.”

From the Leviticus Rabbah, he quoted a metaphorical story of sitting in a ship, while one man drills a hole into the hull beneath him. When his companions asked what he was doing, the man replied, “I am only boring a hole under my part of the ship.”

Rabbi Swartz also referenced “Rabbinic Letter on the Climate Crisis,” signed by [over 400] continue reading

The Scranton Times-Tribune published the above 9/24/2015. Article by Brendan Gibbons.  An additional article preceded the event  published 9/15/2015 by Sarah Scinto 

Additional resource: Rabbi David Seidenburg of NeoHasid.org has shared a Hebrew translation of the ecumenical prayer by Pope Francis found at the end of the encyclical, and reprinted in Rabbi Daniel Swartz’ study.  Read and download the translation with notes.