Speaker: Julian Agyeman “Beyond Green Environmentalism: E/quality of Life and Just Sustainabilities”

RESCHEDULED from January 28 to March 18 due to weather-related travel issues. 
agyeman
Julian Agyeman, Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University (and co-founder of the Black Environment Network) will speak at the Penn Humanities Forum.  Dr. Agyeman is the originator of the concept of ‘just sustainabilities,‘ the full integration of social justice and sustainability, defined as:

the need to ensure a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, in a just and equitable manner, whilst living within the limits of supporting ecosystems.

The forum is FREE and open to the public, but guests MUST REGISTER.  The talk will be held in the Penn Museum, which offers both bike racks and easy access to public transportation.  If you can’t go, we still encourage you to explore his website!

Talk description found at the Penn Humanities Forum page, and pasted below.

In our current world of climate change, environmental planning must consider social needs and welfare to offer a truly sustainable model of living. Co-founder of the historic Black Environment Network and author of numerous books and articles, Julian Agyeman charts the future of the global city through the topics of resource distribution, race, class, and space.


Julian Agyeman is Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University, Medford, MA. He is an environmental social scientist whose expertise and current research interests are in the complex and embedded relations between humans and the environment, whether mediated by governmental institutions or social movements, and the effects of this on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity.

He is co-founder, and Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability. With over 150 publications, his recent books include Cultivating Food Justice : Race, Class and Sustainability (MIT Press 2011), Introducing Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice (Zed Books 2013), and Incomplete Streets: Processes, Practices and Possibilities(Routledge 2014).

Co-sponsored by Penn’s School of Social Policy and Practice, Green Campus Partnership, and Urban Studies Program.

the power of song

At PA IPL’s 2014 Annual Conference, Climate Justice: Faith in Action  the Rev. Rhetta Morgan of the Ecclesia Spiritual Center drew participants in to the sanctuary for the keynote session by beginning her music in the sanctuary at Summit Presbyterian Church.  After a few announcements, she re-centered us and drew us close in Spirit for an excellent entry into our ably-moderated keynote panel.   Following the panel, Rhetta again led us in inspiring and energizing song, sending us forth from the keynote to the rest of the workshops.  Thanks to Peter Handler, you can get a taste of that here:

Prior to the workshops, participants enjoyed really fabulous refreshments from Weaver’s Way Co-op (with support from the Rock Ethics Institute), and fellowship and conversation with our Green Resources exhibitors.

Why is climate change a Justice issue?

Plenary panelist Victoria Furio has shared her opening remarks at Climate Justice: Faith in Action, PA IPL’s annual conference held on October 26, 2014 at Summit Presbyterian Church. Resource links at the end of this post!VickyFurio - Version 2

Civilization is based on the principle of not harming the other — We could not coexist if we didn’t assure a reasonable expectation of comfort for everyone.

And our legal system is structured the same way — An individual’s rights extend only as far as they do not infringe on another’s. So justice is about freedom from harm. Our laws aim to provide protection for all.

As persons of faith, we have an even higher law to respond to. What God wants is a total harmony among all creatures, in all of Creation. God wants us to have joy and life in Continue reading Why is climate change a Justice issue?

It’s worth the heartbreak to care about climate change. What would it mean if we didn’t?

Plenary panelist Joelle Novey has shared a piece that echos her remarks at Climate Justice: Faith in Action, PA IPL’s annual conference held on October 26, 2014 at Summit Presbyterian Church. joellenovey

Sometimes I wish I didn’t care about climate change.

Each time I speak with a congregation, I try to put into words what keeps me going in this work, when it would be so much less difficult not to care.

What would I have to do to not care about climate change?

First, I would have to not care about anybody who doesn’t live in the United States and is suffering the consequences of a warming climate now. I would also have to not care about anyone who will be alive after I’m gone, and may be harmed in the future. And then I’d have to not care about any other species of plants or animals, who might not be able to adapt fast enough to survive in a rapidly warming climate.

At that point I don’t have to care about climate change, but I have made my world so small … and too lonely.

Every Jewish community I’ve been a part of teaches us to honor every person as made in God’s Continue reading It’s worth the heartbreak to care about climate change. What would it mean if we didn’t?

End profiteering: break the unholy links between race, prison, toxics, and power.

JacquiPPlenary panelist Jacqueline Patterson’s remarks at Climate Justice: Faith in Action, PA IPL’s annual conference held on October 26, 2014 at Summit Presbyterian Church.  

 In my work throughout the country, I see circumstances of compounded structural challenges, particularly for communities of color and low income communities. The drivers and impacts of the climate crisis are in the context of the drivers and the impacts of a broad set of social, political, economic inequities largely driven by the same systemic aim to concentrate power and wealth in the hands of a privileged few.

Three weeks ago, I was in St. Louis to give a talk on place based inequities in the context of the murder of Michael Brown. As part of a tour, I drove through Ferguson in the middle of a downpour and noted how poor the drainage system was, as water pooled in the street Continue reading End profiteering: break the unholy links between race, prison, toxics, and power.

Bill McKibben: Wind in our sails.

Bill McKibben gave us permission to share the video message he prepared for PA IPL’s 2014 conference Climate Justice: Faith in Action.

We’ll share lots more from Climate Justice: Faith in Action as we gather pictures and video from attendees, and the words of our generous and talented contributors.   Subscribe to the blog so that you’ll get an email whenever we post something new (right-side column), or just watch our Facebook page for the links.  Directly below the video you’ll find links to more on a few of the items Bill McKibben mentions within.

NOTES and LINKS:

GROW THE MOVEMENT.

[*editor’s note: I have not been able to track down the author of this “Prezi” but the information and dates match with several publicly available sources]