MECHANICSBURG: Fracking poetry and photos

Ongoing exhibition Feb. 6–March 15 at Messiah College — Shale Play: Documentary Art by Julia Kasdorf and Steven Rubin, an exhibition in collaboration with the Department of English Climenhaga Building, Climenhaga Galleries (upper)

Artist’s Talk/Poetry Reading and Reception: High Center, High Foundation Recital Hall, Feb. 7, 4:15 p.m.

Shale Play, a singular work from an award-winning poet and a veteran documentary photographer, tracks the natural gas boom in the small towns, fields and forests of Appalachian Pennsylvania. In the era of the visual and verbal meme, Rubin and Kasdorf pair documentary poems with photographs in a volume that can be held in the human hand and shared, even in communities that lack high speed internet access.

Learn more about the artists:
juliakasdorf.com                     stevenrubin.com

Interviews with the artists about the book, and the work that led to the book:

image source

You may remember Julia Spicher Kasdorf’s work from the close of our April 2018 newsletter, copied here:

In honor of [the April 13, 2018 A Better Path Coalition] event, we will end with a powerful poem by Pennsylvania docupoet Julia Spicher Kasdorf.  For more from her, including explorations of faith, bookmark this written interview to read with time to reflect.

But first, the poem:

“A Mother on the West Virginia Line Considers the Public Health”
The industry thinks I’m too dumb to back down; they don’t know
I do this for my Mom and Dad. They were 69 and 71.
He had pulmonary fibrosis, worked with asbestos all his life. She grew up
near the coke ovens back when kids were sent into the mines to pick coal.
So they both had lung problems, but their home, the next hollow over,
sits 350 feet from a compressor station. We sealed the house,
set up an air scrubber, but—four of their neighbors passed last year, too.
*
We bought the coal rights to our 115 acres because we know
the company will come up to your front door, but we let the gas go,
just didn’t see this coming. A gentleman from New Jersey leased our land.
One day we come home to find pink ribbons tied in the field. Then bulldozers.
They put in four shallow wells and a Marcellus well on a 5-acre pad

Continue reading where the poem is printed in full with permission

date changes STATE COLLEGE: poetry and photos, fracking and faith

image source

Program begins at 9:00AM, and finishes a bit before 10:00 (in time for 10:00 church)
People of any faith or none are welcome. RSVPs appreciated so they can set up extra chairs.

Join member congregation St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church’s Adult Forum to hear from Poet Julia Spicher Kasdorf  will talk about Shale Play, her newly published collaboration with photographer Steven Rubin.  She will show some images, read some poems

DATE CHANGES (changed due to weather) :
Sunday, FEBRUARY 3rd at 9:00AM at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church

Julia Kasdorf and Steven Rubin have an  exhibit linked to the book at the Bellefonte Art Museum, January 4-27.  They will present together in secular settings:

Jan. 11th at 7:30pm at the  Bellefonte Art Museum
Jan. 24th at 7:30pm

Thursday, January 31 at 7:30pm in the Foster Auditorium in the Pattee and Paterno Library on the Penn State University Park campus.

 

 

Learn more about the artists:
juliakasdorf.com                                    stevenrubin.com

You may remember Julia Spicher Kasdorf’s work from the close of our April 2018 newsletter, copied here:

In honor of [the April 13, 2018 A Better Path Coalition] event, we will end with a powerful poem by Pennsylvania docupoet Julia Spicher Kasdorf.  For more from her, including explorations of faith, bookmark this written interview to read with time to reflect.

But first, the poem:

“A Mother on the West Virginia Line Considers the Public Health”
The industry thinks I’m too dumb to back down; they don’t know
I do this for my Mom and Dad. They were 69 and 71.
He had pulmonary fibrosis, worked with asbestos all his life. She grew up
near the coke ovens back when kids were sent into the mines to pick coal.
So they both had lung problems, but their home, the next hollow over,
sits 350 feet from a compressor station. We sealed the house,
set up an air scrubber, but—four of their neighbors passed last year, too.
*
We bought the coal rights to our 115 acres because we know
the company will come up to your front door, but we let the gas go,
just didn’t see this coming. A gentleman from New Jersey leased our land.
One day we come home to find pink ribbons tied in the field. Then bulldozers.
They put in four shallow wells and a Marcellus well on a 5-acre pad

Continue reading where the poem is printed in full with permission

2017 Annual Conference—Gratitude, Lament & Renewal: walking faithfully in a time of climate disruption

Register

Begin your participation NOW!
We’re building a gallery of walking sticks, made by congregations and communities.
Get a one-pager with these directions.

Walking sticks or staffs often signify wisdom or power.  More practically, they may provide balance, support, navigation through rough terrain; grounding, help, even protection. We need all these things as we journey forward on this bumpy path.

And so: we are creating a gallery of walking sticks, conceived of and made by YOU!  Gather with another person or a small crowd from your congregation or community and begin imagining, planning, and creating now!   

In the stories shared by the Abrahamic traditions, Moses’ staff was used to draw water from a rock and to part the Red Sea.  Walking staffs may be made of single, strong element, or by tightly binding elements that would be too weak or too sharp alone.  Where do you see staffs in your religious tradition? What words or images give you strength?  How might you share those on, in, or through a staff?

Walking Sticks image searchA search for walking sticks, hiking sticks, canes, and wizard staffs on Etsy, Ebay, Pinterest and Google Images will give you amazing visual launching points – you’ll find everything from Yoda and movie wizards, to art-carved hiking sticks, to practical hiking sticks inscribed with memorials or words of strength, and simple sticks scarred by their adventures — or  ornamented with markers of the places they’ve traveled.

Requirements:
Your staff should be meaningful and faith-and-wisdom rooted. It doesn’t have to be postcard pretty or ADA approved! Size and materials are limited to something you can bring with you or mail to us. We will pay postage on standard postage tubes.

Let us know it’s coming!
We want to prepare a place and have a label ready for your contribution to our gallery.  We’ll ask for the name of your congregation and religious tradition(s), for a brief description or interpretive note, and for a photo of the participants (names optional).  You may title your work of art if you are so moved!


logo square Gratitude, Lament & Renewal-Mark your calendar for October 29, and come to the conference!  You’ll leave inspired, energized, and newly connected with other Pennsylvanians who are reaching out in faith to act on climate change.  You’ll add new skills and ideas to your toolbox for adapting for your own work and contexts — we hope in collaboration with PA IPL.  We’re totally excited.  Don’t miss it.  Gather a van-full of registrants from your area and let us know as soon as you can — we’ll apply for transportation funding for your group.


forum and vigil: Climate, Jobs, and Justice: a Moral Response to the Pope’s Urgent Message

Media coverage of the event from the NBC affiliate in Philadelphia:


Original description:
This event is a coalition event planned and supported by many partners (see below).  The event begins at the Friends’ Center, Philadelphia (scroll to bottom for address and map), and ends with a procession around City Hall to LOVE Park for a vigil.  It will take place not far from the Shale Conference happening the same day.    Flier to shareFlyer B&W Climate, Jobs, Justice-FINAL

5:30 gathering and refreshments
6:00-7:15 ” A Just Transition” forum with compelling calls to action from community, faith, labor, and health leaders
7:30 Inspiring, art-filled procession from Friends Center through downtown Philadelphia, ending in a night vigil at LOVE Park.

Please join us for a forum and vigil to lift up Pope Francis’s urgent call for climate action and economic justice!  RSVP

In June, Pope Francis published an urgent letter to people across the world: On Care for Our Common Home.”  The letter urge people everywhere to take decisive action to preserve a livable climate and to build a just economy. The Pope will bring this message to Congress and the United Nations when he visits the US this September.

As Philly prepares for his arrival, hundreds of people from all backgrounds will come together for a forum, procession, and vigil. We will reflect on what the Pope’s message means to us here in Philly. And we will call on our elected officials to commit to a rapid shift to a just and sustainable economy, with renewable energy, clean air, living wage jobs, and justice for those who are harmed most by climate change. Everyone is welcome!

What to Expect:

  • Big, beautiful art
  • Compelling calls to action from faith, community, and labor leaders
  • Presentations about energy, health, pollution, clean jobs, and strategies for building a just and sustainable economy
  • To make friends with neighbors who care about community, people, and planet

Co-sponsored by:

  • 350 Philly
  • Green Justice Philly
  • Pennsylvania Interfaith Power & Light
  • Physicians for Social Responsibility-Philadelphia
  • Sierra Club Southeast PA Beyond Coal Campaign
  • Shalom Center

Let us know if your organization would like to endorse the event! 

Spread the word through Facebook.

Quotes from the Pope’s Letter*PopeFrancis-01

“The urgent challenge to protect our common home includes a concern to bring the whole human family together to seek a sustainable and integral development, for we know that things can change.”
“There is an urgent need to develop policies so that, in the next few years, the emission of carbon dioxide and other highly polluting gases can be drastically reduced, for example, substituting for fossil fuels and developing sources of renewable energy.”
“A sense of deep communion with the rest of nature cannot be real if our hearts lack tenderness, compassion and concern for our fellow human beings. It is clearly inconsistent to combat trafficking in endangered species while remaining completely indifferent to human trafficking, unconcerned about the poor, or undertaking to destroy another human being deemed unwanted.”

HELP BUILD ART FOR THE EVENT:

We are hosting multiple Art Builds for anyone who wants to help create puppets, LED Signs, and giant banners! Learn more and RSVP for the next one here.

Workshop extravaganza!

Over in our Events calendar there is SO MUCH good stuff right now.  Check out a few highlights: 
workshop header
A series of workshops on involving your congregation or community in our work to respond to climate change as an urgent moral issue.

Screen Shot 2015-01-19 at 7.38.04 PM

A climate change art exhibit and auction at PA IPL member congregation Mishkan Shalom (featuring works by Philadelphia PA IPL member Peter Handler.

 Cheryl.MalkahBinahPreaching About Climate Change workshop on Tuesday morning, February 3 — for clergy and non-clergy alike.  Rev. Cheryl Pyrch and Rabbi Melissa Klein will lead a text study of Exodus 23:1-3 (the Torah portion for Feb. 14).  Download a PDF flier from the event listing.

MBW_full Our Earth/Our Story: Climate Change Calls Us to Heal Ourselves and the World workshop hosted by PA IPL member congregation Central Baptist Church on Saturday, Feb. 7. Speaker Charles Eisenstein, author of Sacred Economics and more) .Light lunch included! Download a PDF flier from the event listing

AdvocacyTrainingWorkshopHeaderClimate Disruption is a Moral Issue: Interfaith Climate Advocacy Training (remote or in-person participation) Feb. 19 9:00-5:00; registration required 

Faith, Climate, and Health- Creation Care for a Greener Future #ActOnClimate (1)Faith, Climate, and Health: Creation Care for a Greener Future conference to be held at Cabrini College on April 17.

agyemanAnd we recommend going to hear Julian Agyeman speak on Just Sustainabilities at the Penn Humanities Forum (rescheduled from January).

 

Creating Climate SmART Communities

Today’s post comes to you from Peter Handler, a member of the leadership group of Philly PA IPL.  Join Philly PA IPL for a Prayerful Protest on April 10.

detail from Arctic Ice Reliquary Peter Handler 2011 (figure carving by Casey Gleason)
detail from Arctic Ice Reliquary Peter Handler 2011 (figure carving by Casey Gleason)

For over three years,  I have been working with two partners, one in New York, and one in Washington DC on a project called Honoring The Future.  We are committed to using the work of artists to raise issues, to educate, and to move people, not only through their heads, but also through their hearts.  We believe that art reaches people, in part, emotionally, and can reach people sometimes in a way that pure science may not.  We consider that artists may be the prophets of our day, telling us the things that we may need to know and not want to hear.  As artists, we talk about what is, what may happen, and where we would like to go.

Our first public event, Climate SmART: Artists Respond to Climate Change, will be on April 16 Continue reading Creating Climate SmART Communities