Annual Conference-Register now!

This Statewide Annual Conference will be statewide in a whole new way.

We will gather in person in Scranton, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh for The Long Journey: From Extracting the Past to Cultivating a Future.  Our three sites will share a fantastic keynote speaker, and each will have live, locally-focused workshops.

register Scranton — register Philadelphia — register Pittsburgh

get Scranton fliers b&w color — get Philadelphia fliers b&w color — get Pittsburgh fliers b&w color

Link to learn more about the conference.

Share the Facebook Event pages.

Your pre-registration helps us plan!  There are a variety of fees for pre-registration, with options for group registrations and the opportunity to pay a little more if you can, or pay a little less if you need to.  Scholarships are only available by way of pre-registration.  Click through to the registration pages for more information.

2018 Annual Conference — Facing the Climate Crisis: Called to Save our Common Home

REGISTER NOW: Saturday, October 27, 2018, 11:30-4:30, Pittsburgh  Doors open at 11 for lunch, registration, a faith-full Green Fair, and more!


FULL INFO and registration.

Take me directly to REGISTRATION.

Facing the Climate Crisis: Called to Save Our Sacred Home is being generously hosted by St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1066 Washington Road,  Mt. Lebanon, PA 15228  We have a wonderful set of keynote speakers and workshop leaders.

Bulletin inserts, fliers to post, and blurbs for online calendars and electronic newsletters are ready for September and October publications and worship publications!

We value the richness of interfaith work, with all its challenges. We recognize that events will take place on days which conflict with some religious practices. Following 4 years of Sunday afternoon conferences, this conference will be on a Saturday, but we are working with partners to announce a nearby Shabbat service for Jewish friends and members whose practice will allow them to participate in a faith-rooted conference following Saturday morning services. We will continue to strive to offer a mix of Saturday, Sunday, and weeknight events in the future. We hope you will join us whenever you are able. 

2018 conference page.
past conferences

2017 Annual Conference—Gratitude, Lament & Renewal: walking faithfully in a time of climate disruption

Register

Begin your participation NOW!
We’re building a gallery of walking sticks, made by congregations and communities.
Get a one-pager with these directions.

Walking sticks or staffs often signify wisdom or power.  More practically, they may provide balance, support, navigation through rough terrain; grounding, help, even protection. We need all these things as we journey forward on this bumpy path.

And so: we are creating a gallery of walking sticks, conceived of and made by YOU!  Gather with another person or a small crowd from your congregation or community and begin imagining, planning, and creating now!   

In the stories shared by the Abrahamic traditions, Moses’ staff was used to draw water from a rock and to part the Red Sea.  Walking staffs may be made of single, strong element, or by tightly binding elements that would be too weak or too sharp alone.  Where do you see staffs in your religious tradition? What words or images give you strength?  How might you share those on, in, or through a staff?

Walking Sticks image searchA search for walking sticks, hiking sticks, canes, and wizard staffs on Etsy, Ebay, Pinterest and Google Images will give you amazing visual launching points – you’ll find everything from Yoda and movie wizards, to art-carved hiking sticks, to practical hiking sticks inscribed with memorials or words of strength, and simple sticks scarred by their adventures — or  ornamented with markers of the places they’ve traveled.

Requirements:
Your staff should be meaningful and faith-and-wisdom rooted. It doesn’t have to be postcard pretty or ADA approved! Size and materials are limited to something you can bring with you or mail to us. We will pay postage on standard postage tubes.

Let us know it’s coming!
We want to prepare a place and have a label ready for your contribution to our gallery.  We’ll ask for the name of your congregation and religious tradition(s), for a brief description or interpretive note, and for a photo of the participants (names optional).  You may title your work of art if you are so moved!


logo square Gratitude, Lament & Renewal-Mark your calendar for October 29, and come to the conference!  You’ll leave inspired, energized, and newly connected with other Pennsylvanians who are reaching out in faith to act on climate change.  You’ll add new skills and ideas to your toolbox for adapting for your own work and contexts — we hope in collaboration with PA IPL.  We’re totally excited.  Don’t miss it.  Gather a van-full of registrants from your area and let us know as soon as you can — we’ll apply for transportation funding for your group.


2017 Conference fliers are BEAUTIES! Share widely!

The 2017 Annual Conference fliers, posters and bulletin inserts are here.

Get your flier (8.5×11 poster)
Get your 1/2 page bulletin insert to distribute in your congregation the sooner the better!

REGISTER

Does your congregation publish an e-newsletter, calendar or blog?  Grab this language…or use our Conference page to customize for your own community:

This year Pennsylvania Interfaith Power & Light’s statewide annual conference is in State College.  The conference will feature faith resources (and national-level speakers) from a variety of faith traditions, and will lift up themes we find in many traditions.  Gratitude, Lament & Renewal: Walking Faithfully in a Time of Climate Disruption, will be held on Sunday, October 29th, from 1:30 – 5:30 pm at The Church of the Good Shepherd in Gray’s Woods.  Registration and more information about the conference is available at https://paipl.us/what-do-we-do/annual-meeting/

If you add this QR code to printed announcements, folks can use their phones to get directly to the conference page on our website.   (The QR code will still work if you shrink it or resize it, just be sure to keep it square.)

Were you looking for that Walking Stick project flier?  Here it is again, now with conference info on the reverse.

Use the “invite” feature of the conference Facebook event page to spread the word, too.

REGISTER

2016 Annual Conference: An Environment of Justice

Join us on the afternoon of October 30 for our 2016 statewide annual conference, An Environment of Justice.  Dr. Jalonne L. White-Newsome of the Kresge Foundation will offer the keynote presentation, as well as one of 9 remarkable workshops.  She has shared her keynote teaser and workshop objectives with us, and we’re pleased to share them with you (title above, more on the conference page.)

untitled-designSkip straight to registration: REGISTER NOW
Click through to read more, get sharable fliers, and then register.


WATCH — it’ll take you 78 seconds.
Share the link to this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4SjEOe-48aY

Everyday Ethics: Environmental Justice

Originally published Rock Ethics Institute screenshot logoby the Rock Ethics Institute of the Pennsylvania State University.  Written by Dr. Jon Brockopp, director of the Initiative on Religion and Ethics for the Institute.  Published at the Centre Daily Times on October 28, 2016

Environmental Justice

We Americans like to think of ourselves as an ethical people. For generations, our presidents have referred to America as the “shining city on a hill” and “the brightest beacon for freedom and opportunity in the world.” We pledge allegiance to a flag that stands for “liberty and justice for all.”

That word “all” is key. If our lofty declarations are to have any meaning, then justice must be available for everyone, including the vulnerable and the oppressed.

The difficulty is not with the principle of the thing – pretty much everyone I know would move quickly to correct an injustice if, say, they accidentally mowed over a neighbor’s prized peonies. The difficulty is in the fact that acts of injustice often happen out of sight.

Whatever else the Black Lives Matter movement has accomplished, it has clearly shown how hard it is to see injustice happening in our own country.

For example, in almost 30 years of driving, I’ve hardly ever been pulled over by a police officer, and I’ve certainly never had one pull a gun on me. That’s why I found the video of Walter Scott being shot in the back while running away from officer Michael Slager so shocking. As a middle-aged white man, I’ve never seen anything like this. I could hardly believe it was real.

Black Lives Matter helps us to see systemic racism, discriminatory actions that are simply built into the system. Now that I know, I must respond, because I’m willing to work hard to ensure that ours is a moral society. But other forms of injustice are just as hard to see.

Like most Americans, I am an energy hog. Just in living out my normal life of heating my house, driving my car, and flying out to visit my elderly parents, I pollute the atmosphere. No big deal, right? Everyone does it, right?

Well, [keep reading and see how it connects to our 2016 Annual Conference: An Environment of Justice]