Tag Archives: Paris

Religious Leaders Condemn Trump’s Withdrawal from the Paris Agreement

President Trump’s announcement on June 1, 2017 that he will withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement has inspired a diverse chorus of condemnation from religious leaders and organizations in the U.S. and across the globe. If your tradition or denomination has issued a statement that you don’t see listed below, please let us know. And if your tradition or denomination has not yet released a statement, ask your leaders to do so—and send them this page of religious statements for inspiration!

COP21Religious Statements Condemning U.S. Withdrawal from Paris Agreement

But wait…there’s more! Religious Statements in Support of Paris Agreement and/or Climate Action

Moving forward with municipalities.

We can move forward boldly and fairly to meet the goals of the Paris Accord even when our President chooses not to lead.  It’s already happening.  Now is the moment to invite your mayor, your city council, and your community to join the action.

Ready for 100 and Cities 100
A number of our members are working with the Ready for 100 campaign to move their cities forward, and drastically reduce their emissions.  Mayors can sign on officially — before the 2017 US Conference of Mayors meeting at the end of June is ideal.  Cities 100 is the Climate Reality Project’s effort, with varied examples to share locally.

All Hands On Deck: Going to Zero Emissions in Pennsylvania
Our friend (and 2012 recipient of our PA IPL Visionary Award) Don Brown brought together a statewide group of organizations (including PA IPL) to commit to working together getting to zero emissions by 2050.  Click through to read the declaration, which is full of official Whereas-es so that it can be used easily in official contexts, but which is also highly readable; it gives important background, and sets clear goals.  Board members Bill Lochstet and Behzad Zandieh were on hand for the official announcement in the Capitol Complex on April 25, and for the leaders’ discussion afterwards.

Ferguson Township climate resolutionAnd on Monday, May 15, Peter Buckland (2015 PA IPL cyclist, and member of the Ferguson Township Board of Supervisors in greater State College) introduced this resolution to his township. Read Peter’s excellent piece on his personal blog  — he is willing to make himself available to other municipal officials wanting to move this forward.  The Board of Supervisors voted overwhelmingly to continue work toward adopting the resolution.  Township staff will review and edit, and then it will come back for public discussion, followed by supervisor deliberation.  As you see above, the supervisors heard the resolution and made their decision in the company of many.  Residents and those excited by this bold action attended the meeting, with PA IPL cyclists gathering to riding to the meeting together.  The resolution and decision were covered by WTAJ-TV news, the Johnstown Altoona CBS affiliate, and by the Public News Service.

The campaign calls on all levels of Pennsylvania government and Pennsylvania public and private sector organizations to immediately begin to adopt strategies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to achieve net zero between 2045 and 2075.   Although the challenge to prevent catastrophic warming is staggering, leadership from sub-national governments around the world is arising that offers hope. Local leadership is aware of local resources that may be invisible at national scales, and non-fossil energy prices are rapidly falling.

Cosponsors of this campaign are:

Islamic Horizons: Divest and Reinvest

Reprinted from Islamic Horizons, September-October 2016, pp. 38-39
written by Saffet Abid Catovic, one of the authors of the Islamic Declaration on Climate Change. [Recommended further reading about mosques in Morrocco taking action, and about a mosque in North Carolina responding to the Islamic Declaration on Climate Change.]
Islamic Horizons COP21 and divestment

Muslims involved in the environmental “green” movement often cite two of Prophet Muhammad’s (salla Allahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) hadiths: “Indeed the world is green and sweet, and indeed God has left you to remain to see how you behave. So beware of the world, beware of the world” and “People have common share in three (things): Grass (herbage/vegetation for humanity and animals), water and fire (light, heat and power, which includes the electrical power derived from burning fossil fuels and other sources of energy).”

Most conflicts throughout history, regardless of their size, can be tied, in one way or another, to one side’s access and/or control over these finite life-sustaining resources. Currently, these resources are not being shared equitably, in terms of the present members of creation and those yet to come. Just as the global faith communities and their leaders have declared their intent to battle climate change by releasing statements and declarations (e.g., the Papal Encyclical on the Environment and Climate Change and Laudato Si), local faith leaders must continue to mobilize their congregations to pursue this cause.

Meeting in Istanbul on Aug. 17-18, 2015, over 60 Muslim scholars, academics, and environmental activists from around the world adopted an Islamic Declaration on Global Climate Change. This bold grassroots initiative was driven by various NGOs, including…

Read the rest of the article at Islamic Horizons (you will have to navigate to pp. 38-39), or via a PDF of the same article.

The Islamic Declaration on Climate Change that was released in the space between the publication of Pope Francis’ encyclical Laudato Si, and the COP21 talks in Paris.  You can find links to the encyclical, the Islamic Declaration, and many other multifaith resources published in that time period on our website here.

We recommended clicking through to read about how these statements are leading to actino in mosques in Morrocco, and in a mosque in North Carolina.]

Paris COP21 Report-back: presentation and discussion with Pittsburgh filmmaker Mark Dixon

The Paris Climate Summit (COP 21) received unprecedented levels of coverage, and officials and proceedings were held in prayer by people of all faiths, from all corners of the world.  In the end: a new agreement was reached!

Whether you’ve read a lot or only a little, you are welcome to join us for a thoughtful presentation and discussion with Mark Dixon, citizen journalist, who traveled to witness this important moment.

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Tuesday, January 19, 7:00 PM
hosted by First United Methodist Church of Pittsburgh,
5401 Centre Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15232

PA IPL particularly encourages clergy, lay leaders, and faith-linked green teams to attend, and to follow up with a lunchtime conference call discussion about responding to climate change in our own congregations, Friday 2/22 12:15-1:00 PM.  RSVP for more info.

Co-sponsored by PA Interfaith Power & Light, the Environmental Justice Committee of The Thomas Merton Center, and Pittsburgh 350.org

Shrinking your foodprint part 2—habits

Check back here for a one-a-day series of actions and solutions from now until 12/11, while the international climate talks (COP 21) are going on in Paris.  Check out this piece from the World Council of Churches about food justice and climate change called COP 21: how climate change affects access to our daily bread

Today, in part 2 of Shrinking Your Foodprint: foodprint-shrinking, efficient habits… (what we eat is coming tomorrow, I promise!)  Want more inspiration?  Refer back to this post for videos where you can listen to smart people talk about food, faith and food justice.

  1. Put the lid on when you’re boiling water.
  2. Only boil as much water as you need.
  3. Cover or contain things in the fridge (moisture makes the compressor work harder, and your food will be less edible sooner, too)
  4. Store food that needs to be eaten in high-visibility places.
  5. Cook whenever possible!  You’ll create less landfill waste, and use fewer take-out containers.
  6. Think of the oven as the SUV of your kitchen.  Use it when it’s the right tool for the job, but don’t leave it running when there’s nothing in it, and try to use all the space when it’s on.  You can also heat once, cook twice to save a little warm-up time.  In the summer: avoid the oven, it’ll heat your house up.  Must use it?  At night, when you can open the windows!   In the winter, when you’re done cooking, leave the door open for a bit (if you can, safely) to let the heat into the house.
  7. Choose a strategy: EITHER make only what you will eat, OR purposely make extra and freeze portion-sizes, pack ready-to-go lunches, or share with a neighbor.   Do you make award winning chili?  If your neighbor has a different quantity-cook specialty, make double and swap — 2 meals for one prep!
  8. Buy things in less packaging.  When you have a choice of heavier or lighter versions of the same food (think canned beans v. bagged beans), or refrigerated or shelf-stable versions (think salad dressing) choose lighter (fewer emissions to transport) or stable (eliminate refrigeration.
  9. Pick a month (January?) and make that the month you clean the coils in the back of your fridge or the vent at the bottom, change any filters, and check for a good seal with no leaks on both fridge and freezer.
  10. There is need to run hot water in the sink to wash your hands —its the soap, water, and friction that get the job done.
  11. Clean-up: Be efficient with your hot water when you’re finished with your meal.  Scrape your plates.  If you’re handwashing use a basin or stop the sink rather than letting the water run. If you use a dishwasher, experiment to figure out if you can skip the rinse, and see if your model lets you air dry instead of heat-drying.

Mmmmm. Food. Shrinking your foodprint part 1

Check back here for a one-a-day series of actions and solutions from now until 12/11, while the international climate talks (COP 21) are going on in Paris.  Check out this piece from the World Council of Churches about food justice and climate change called COP 21: how climate change affects access to our daily bread

There are so many ways to shrink our “foodprints.”  Today, we’ll address the one part of the puzzle most people don’t associate with climate change: avoiding waste

Don’t waste.  Seriously.  Food waste is a huge problem.  Click on the graphic below for lots more info.  In 2013 alone, Americans threw out over 37 million tons—or 74 billion pounds—of food (source).  Screen Shot 2015-12-09 at 4.27.35 PM

Improve together! There is so much generational wisdom to tap into here.  Think about interviewing all the folks in your congregation or community who lived through culturally lean times, and cooked most of their own food.  You’ll find people who know how to make amazing soup stock from not-so-edible remainders.  You’ll find people who know how to plan a series of menus that draw on part of the one before, making something different and new (so it doesn’t feel like leftovers) using some of the same ingredients, so that you can use everything up.  You’ll find people with amazing systems for freezing leftovers that will be the basis of another meal — and finding them when they’re needed.  You will even find people who know how to “put up” backyard garden overflow.    Add to that our much-easier modern access to varied spices and recipes, and you’ve got yourself a recipe for a great potluck+PDF recipe or instruction book.

Here’s an excellent demonstration by a guy in England (who uses the Food 52 website based in NY as his resource).  I find that quesadillas or wraps, pizza, omelettes and salad can absorb many small-quantity leftovers.

The rest of his waste-less-food page has lots of tips: I recommend the first video on the page (though I haven’t done it yet).

Pro tip: Sell By, Best By, and Use By dates are all a little different.  Learn more about what you can really eat and when, and remember that if you pop something in the freezer by one of those dates, you can safely eat it long after the date has passed.

Compost.  Food waste in landfills often doesn’t get enough oxygen to break down well, and ends up producing methane, a much stronger greenhouse gas.  Plus, your flowers and veggies will looooove your compost.  If you go for an indoor worm bin, you’ll also get compost tea.  Your houseplants have never looked better.   Tune in soon for a story from St. Martin in the Fields’ Blessing of the Heap.

Waste matters.    Food waste (not including the linked land-use changes) accounts for  About 1/3 of our food waste occurs at the consumer level.  That’s the place where we are totally in control.  Nearly 2/3 is wasted in production and distribution.  Consumers can help with the 2/3 part, too, by asking groceries for special lower-price bins of not-so-beautiful produce for example, or by working with groceries, restaurants, kitchens and food pantries to help with a gleaning program.  (Get a glimpse of the problem and some solutions in this National Geographic article; this partner article is subtitled: producing the food we throw away generates more greenhouse gasses than most entire countries do)

I’ll leave you with this, quoted in an article about a Food and Agriculture Organization report:

“Finally, produced but uneaten food vainly occupies almost 1.4 billion hectares of land; this represents close to 30 percent of the world’s agricultural land area.”

“We simply cannot allow one-third of all the food we produce to go to waste or be lost because of inappropriate practices, when 870 million people go hungry every day,” said the FAO’s director-general, José Graziano da Silva.”